ANTIQUE TEXTILE ART III
A Collection of Oriental and European Carpets and Textiles
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5. 
Filikli Rug
Central Anatolia
Circa 1950
230 x 137 cm (7’7” x 4’6”)


Notes: Symmetrically knotted mohair wool pile on a wool foundation
First featured in our 1999 Minimal exhibition, filikli rugs represent probably the earliest, most primitive form of weaving known to mankind, veritably untouched over the course of a few thousand years. This example is woven with unspun mohair wool dip dyed in indigo, where the non-uniform dyeing of the yarn helps to create a kind of woven sculpture, with long, cascading lustruous blue wool.
Bibliography: U. Hirsch, ‘The Fabric of Deities & Kings’, Hali, vol. 13, n. 4, (London, August 1991): 104-111.
J.T. Wertime, ‘Back to Basics – Primitive Pile Rugs of West & Central Asia’, Hali, Issue 100 (London, 1998): 86-97.

 



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